As the Trinity River remains at flood stage, I have tried to get out a bit and photograph whenever I have a few hours free.

Yesterday afternoon I was out at the Buckeye Trail and ran into my friend Ben Sandifer. Ben has explored more of the Great Trinity Forest than anyone I know and is a fantastic photographer to boot.

We tried to enter the Buckeye Trail, but the water was just too high.  So we hiked over to check out a nearby lake (nicknamed “Bart Simpson Lake”) and “Pirate Island“.

It had been a cloudy day, but as we got closer to the lake, the sun slowly broke through and gave us a lovely light-show of soft pastels. In some spots, clasping coneflowers that had been high and dry before the rains started were now barely above water.

Lake and Pirate Island after Trinity River Flood, with clasping coneflowers in foreground, William Blair Park, Great Trinity Forest, Dallas, Texas, USA

Lake and Pirate Island after Trinity River Flood, with clasping coneflowers in foreground, William Blair Park, Great Trinity Forest, Dallas, Texas, USA

Sunset on lake and Pirate Island after Trinity River Flood, with clasping coneflowers in foreground, William Blair Park, Great Trinity Forest, Dallas, Texas, USA

For a few brief minutes, the sun broke through completely, and I waded out far enough into the lake where I only had the  simple pastel reflections in the foreground.

Reflections of sky on lake near Pirate Island with high water after Trinity River Flood, William Blair Park, Great Trinity Forest, Dallas, Texas, USA

Reflections of sky on lake near Pirate Island with high water after Trinity River Flood, William Blair Park, Great Trinity Forest, Dallas, Texas, USA. Canon 1Dx. 31mm. ISO 100. f.13 @ 1/6 second. EV +⅔.

As the light faded, I got a couple of photos of Ben, doing his magic.

Photographer and sunset on lake and Pirate Island after Trinity River Flood, with clasping coneflowers in foreground, William Blair Park, Great Trinity Forest, Dallas, Texas, USA

It is hard to believe this is in Dallas, sometimes, about 5 miles from my house. If you want to read more on the Great Trinity Forest, be sure to check out Ben’s Dallas Trinity Trails site and Law Man Walking : Nature Treks with Bill Holston that Bill writes for D Magazine.